It is possible to have a revision of a previous weight loss operation that has failed if there is a technical or mechanical issue with the surgery. It is also possible to undergo a conversion to a different operation that may provide better success in some cases.

    Examples of operations that may benefit from a revision include:
  • Gastric bypass with a dilated and stretched pouch or stomach
  • Lap-band with slippage or poor position.
    Examples of operations that may benefit from a conversion to another operation include:
  • Converting a failed VBG or Lap-band to a gastric bypass
  • Converting previous failed reflux operations like a Nissen fundoplication to a gastric bypass for persistent reflux or reflux associated with severe obesity.

Examples of operations that may benefit from a revision include a gastric bypass with a dilated and stretched pouch or stomach, and a Lap-band with slippage or poor position.

Examples of operations that may benefit from a conversion to another operation include converting a failed VBG or Lap-band to a gastric bypass. We also consider converting previous failed reflux operations like a Nissen fundoplication to a gastric bypass for persistent reflux or reflux associated with severe obesity.

In order for us to determine if you will benefit from a revision or conversion we need some information on your previous surgery, and there are several tests to be performed. We need a copy of your original operation report to verify what was done at the initial surgery. We then need an Upper GI series x-ray done within the last 3 months, and we need to see the actual x-ray films in our office. Both the report and x-rays can be mailed to us along with the 5 page information sheet in our office packet. We will then set up an appointment and we will schedule an outpatient EGD (gastroscopy) so we can actually look in the stomach under sedation and verify the original surgery appearance and problems. We must perform this procedure ourselves in Atlanta, no exceptions.

Revisions and conversions are not possible in everyone. There is a three times greater risk of complications after revision surgery with a 3-5% leak rate and 1-2% chance of dying of a complication. Only after we complete our evaluation and identify a potentially correctable problem and you understand and accept the risk, complications and alternatives will we consider additional surgery as an option.

Overall only 50% of revisions and conversions will lose a significant amount of weight (50% excess weight loss) due to continued behavioral and eating disorders which defeat the surgery.

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